Balance is an invitation to failure. In my experience, not only is balance hard to achieve but it is also the least likely to satisfy anyone. Does your child with the 103-degree fever want you to be 50 per cent there? How about work, the week that you’re closing a $33-million deal? Fifty per cent won’t cut it there, either. Instead of balance, strive for the right fit. Determine what mix of work, family, play and giving back optimizes your talents and happiness, and set your own formula for success. Think more like the tower-of-blocks game Jenga than a scale; it may not be pretty, but it’s grounded in reality and more likely to work.

Middle-class kids spend billions to project street cred; supermodels weigh as little as famine victims; designers channel the swagger of nomadic tribesmen; convicts set the standards for body art; the guerilla uniform of aviators, camouflage, and a knitted cap is a perennial favorite for celebrities incognito. Thus do the least oppressed citizens of the world express their imagined solidarity—expensively, in one respect; cheaply, in another—with the most marginal. You invert an hourglass when the sand runs out, and the fashion world inverts the social hierarchy when the trappings of privilege lose their glamour. But it’s also a conceit that we owe to the Romantics: in a civilized milieu, ferocity confers cachet. The upshot is a pair of jeans, pummelled by a bored animal—a slave laborer, you might say—with a four-digit price tag.

But just because Mass Indie is pro-diversity, doesn’t mean it’s post-scarcity. There’s a limited amount of difference in the world, and the mainstreaming of its pursuit has only made difference all the scarcer. The anxiety that there is no new terrain is always a catalyst for change.

The photographer knows well that after taking many pictures one develops “the camera eye”: vision becomes like the viewfinder, always perceiving the world through the logic of the camera mechanism via framing, lighting, depth of field, focus, movement and so on. Even without the camera in hand the world becomes transformed into the status of the potential-photograph.

Today, we are in danger of developing a “Facebook Eye”: our brains always looking for moments where the ephemeral blur of lived experience might best be translated into a Facebook post; one that will draw the most comments and “likes.”

For some reason, we’re hesitant to simply strike up a conversation with someone unless we know we have something in common (e.g. went to the university, same profession, etc.). Somehow, we forget that the thing that we have in common is that we’re both humans, and we have the gifts of speech, the ability to reason, and social intelligence, that exclusively human capability to navigate and negotiate complex social relationships.

We’re not going to go in saying this team’s sitting here, this team’s sitting here; we’re going to design different types of areas, and as teams grow or fall apart or come together, they can move around based on their needs.

The Moustache.

Sure, they begin awkward and skeptical. But before long they evolve into the lions of the upper lip, the world’s only growable aphrodisiac, and a shining symbol of class and confidence with undertones of cinnamon and oak.

Music is art, and art is important and rare. Important, rare things are valuable. Valuable things should be paid for. It’s my opinion that music should not be free, and my prediction is that individual artists and their labels will someday decide what an album’s price point is. I hope they don’t underestimate themselves or undervalue their art.

4. Get off your fucking phone when you’re with people

Whether or not you do it too sometimes, you definitely know the feeling of your listener’s attention dropping away from what you’re saying, as they peek at their phone and start swiping away. It shouldn’t be a particularly valiant thing to decide not to do this to people.”

From 5 rules of thumb for interacting with people by David Cain